Tag: Tokyo Gardens

A Tokyo Power Garden

You’ve heard of the power lunch, power walk, and power nap, right? Well, Koishikawa Korakuen is a power garden. It was commissioned in the 17th Century by a member of the ruling Tokugawa clan. The name means “the garden for enjoying power later on”, at least according to the Tokyo Parks website.

Rikugien, a Tokyo Stroll Garden

Rikugien was completed around 1700, commissioned by the son of a high-ranking official. Eventually, it was purchased by the family that owns Mitsubishi, then turned over to the public. This was our second visit to this garden, since we were here last August.

Visiting Tokyo’s Sensoji Temple

So when we left off telling you about our trip to Japan we had just gotten off the Sumida River water bus at the Akasuka stop. From there we were walking to Sensoji, one of Tokyo’s most venerable Buddhist Temples. Alas, it was still raining.

Tokyo’s Hama Rikyu Garden in the Rain

Our first day in Tokyo this past September, Judy and I visited Hama Rikyu Garden. Some four hundred years ago this garden consisted of a shallow pond and marshland used by feudal lords for duck hunting. Today, however, it is surrounded by the skyscrapers of downtown Tokyo.

Koishikawa Korakuen Garden, 2017

Yesterday Judy and I revisited the Koishikawa Korakuen Garden in Tokyo in time to see the Spider Lilies (Lycoris radiata) bloom. Tomorrow we fly back to Chicago.

White Crane (or Maybe an Egret)

Hunting for a nosh at Hama-Rikyu garden in Tokyo.  

Hama Rikyu

Hama Rikyu is a large green space located where the Sumida River flows into Tokyo Bay, just across from Tokyo’s central fish market.

East Garden of Tokyo’s Imperial Palace

The Imperial Palace was within walking distance of our Tokyo hotel. The inner grounds of the Palace are generally not open to the public. The East Garden, however, is readily accessible.

Rikugi-en, a Poetic Landscape

Not far from Ueno Park, Rikugi-en was my favorite garden in Tokyo. Completed around 1700, it was created for the mansion of a high-ranking samurai.

Tokyo’s Ueno Park

We really only saw one corner of Ueno Park, which is one of Japan’s first Western-style recreation areas. It’s a big place, over 100 acres, and it contains a zoo, shrines and temples, and several major museums.