American Fringe Trees (Chionanthus virginicus) and Peonies have little in common, except that they are providing some of the most striking blooms in our garden at this moment.  

Every year I like to give a little push for 2 native Currants that, I believe, could be more widely utilized in home landscapes.

Spicebush (Lindera benzoin) is a native alternative to Forsythia that’s certainly worth considering. It’s a shrub that offers much more than yellow flowers in spring.

All this time at home, and it’s been too cold and wet to do much in the garden lately. In fact, it snowed all afternoon today, damn it! So I have not much to do but think up schemes, schemes that will further explode my garden budget deficit.  

So before I write about spring cleanup in the garden, which is going pretty well, I have to touch on an unpleasant subject. Namely, my failure to protect all my woody plants from girdling.

About 2 weeks ago on a mild February Saturday, I decided it was time to prune our ‘Donald Wyman’ crabapple out front. Some people say crabapples should be pruned right after they bloom in order to minimize the impact on flowering the following year. Even so, I went with February so I could see what …

So you’re walking along in a pleasant Denver neighborhood of single family homes, when suddenly you come upon a front yard that looks distinctly different. This is the garden of Jim Borland, a retired radio talk show host, and one of my favorite stops on the Denver Garden Bloggers Fling last June.

Burning Bush (Euonymus alatus) is an invasive shrub that can be found in many gardens, including our own. I have not yet been able to convince Judy to let me get rid of it.

There’s an American Witch-Hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) planted on the east side of the house. Rabbits chewed it to the ground every year before I protected it with hardware cloth.  Then it bounded upward and quickly reached its current height of about 10′. It’s still growing, I think.

There are so many fruits on our  ‘Donald Wyman’ Crabapple that the branches are bending under the weight.