Tag: Northern Sea Oats

A Bit More Fall Color and a Spam Alert

There’s some decent fall color in our garden right now, though it’s an area I’ve identified for future improvement. This long, mild autumn has given us more time to enjoy the seasonal hues, though for some plants it may have delayed the arrival of fall color.

Three Great Grasses for Fall

This is going to be a short post, because I got up too early today (too early for a Saturday, anyhow) and drove to another city and had meetings and then drove back and so now I am tired. Anyhow, today is Garden Bloggers’ Foliage Day, sponsored by Cristina of My Hesperides Garden. And I’m …

Ignore the Flowers Day: September, 2016

For me, blooms make the garden. This attitude is considered unsophisticated by some, who say we must pay greater attention to more enduring plant features: foliage, texture, structure, yada yada. Grudgingly, I admit that there is something to what these people say, which is why on the 22nd of most months I participate in Ignore …

Tall Grass in August

It’s been a hot summer with plenty of rain. The ornamental grasses in our garden remain an almost luminous green, and most seem taller than usual.  

July Fruit’n’Foliage

Don’t you think Fruit’n’Foliage would make a good name for a breakfast cereal? It could be made with kale flakes and blueberries. Or not blueberries – too common. Kale flakes and açai berries! You heard it here first. But enough of that. Today I want to look at interesting things in the garden that aren’t …

Fight Garlic Mustard with Native Groundcovers

Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata), Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica), and Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica). If plants could ride horses, these would be the three horsemen of the Invasive Plant Apocalypse – at least for shady areas in the Midwest. However, a recent post in The Native Plant Herald (the blog of Prairie Nursery in Wisconsin) tells us …

Those Dazzling November Days

In the normal course of events, November is one of the two most dismal months of the year. At least, in my part of the world. An inky blackness falls by 5 PM, the leaves are dead, and a penetrating chill is in the air. (The other most dismal month is February.)

A Slow Fall

Autumn this year has not been very autumnal. From childhood I associate fall with a raw chill and leafy puddles. This year, however, has been unusually dry and warm, conditions associated with more modest seasonal color. There is still some color to be seen, though.

September Grasses

This September has been rather warm, with now and then more than a hint of summer. Leaves are still green on plants both woody and herbaceous. However, my attention is often seized by seedheads on the grasses. Of all the grasses of September, I think Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is the most glorious. Judy took these pictures …

Curb Appeal

The front garden is the one thing that really brings out my exhibitionist tendencies. I want it to grab the attention of people walking or driving by. Late summer is one of the times when the front garden has its greatest visual impact. Some of the blooms of mid-summer become even showier and more prolific. …