I went through a Daylily (Hemerocallis sp. and cvs.) phase for a year or two, then lost interest. This says more about me than it does about Daylilies – I go through frequent periods of enthusiasm for a particular species or genus of plant. In most cases the enthusiasm fades, but leaves behind a few …

Front yards are for showing off. That’s what I believe. That’s why when I think about what I’m going to plant and where, I think about how it will look to passersby on the sidewalk.

The genus Monarda brings wonderful gifts to the garden. Through trial and error, though, I’ve come to realize that getting the most out of Monarda species takes a certain amount of thought.

There’s a hole at one end of the Driveway Border that I had expected to be full of colorful flowers by now. But it was not to be. A number of plants have been harmed by Four-Lined Plant Bugs (FLPB) this year, none more so than the Culver’s Root (Veronicastrum virginucum). Here’s how the Culver’s …

We’re coming out of a lull in which the Front Garden was almost entirely green. Sure, I know green is a color but still – it’s not a color. You know what I’m saying. Now, as we shift into summer, the real colors are coming back.

This weekend was full of observances in our family. Saturday was Judy’s birthday. Sunday was our wedding anniversary – the 35th. Also Father’s Day, of course.

Last fall I purchased 2 Bowman’s Root (Porteranthus trifoliatus or Gillenia trifoliata, depending on who  you ask), after seeing them massed beautifully outside Lurie Garden. Though it’s been less than a year, I’ve made up my mind: I definitely want more.

June is the month of blue flowers, or so it seems in our garden. Sadly, we are missing one of my favorites, Wild Indigo (Baptisia australis), which was lost to sewer repair. I planted a replacement, but it won’t bloom this year.

In our garden, at least, the Tulips in their season are star performers, adding a zingy drama to the area in front of the house.

On the third day of the Denver Garden Bloggers Fling we visited the home garden of Rob Proctor and David Macke. Rob Proctor used to be the director of horticulture at the Denver Botanic Gardens, so I was looking forward to this visit with keen anticipation.