Actually, the first Daffodils bloom in the Back Garden, which is fairly sunny before the trees leaf out.

A number of Species Tulips can play an important role in the build up to the Great Tulip Crescendo of late April and May.

On Monday it reached into the low 70s (F), constituting a one-day heat wave, at least in the context of early April in Chicago, especially for a cool spring like the one we are having.

Now that the Snowdrops are done, I’ve been spending a good deal of time inspecting the progress of all the other bulbs. While it’s still early spring hereabouts, there are a few blooms out there.

In a recent post I wondered if I should divide some of our Snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis and G. elwesii) clumps. Several readers answered in the affirmative. Then I just happened to read in Anna Pavord’s encyclopedic book Bulbs that Snowdrops should be planted right after flowering.

We put up our new trellises the other day, and I’m pretty happy with them. These were the 9′ Panacea Giant Wall Trellises I wrote about earlier. They’re certainly a big improvement.

This is the closest I’ve felt to being grounded since I was about 15 years old. Any suggestion that I might head out into the wider world runs into intense spousal opposition. However, I can always go into the garden. Even when it’s too wet or cold to do any actual gardening, there is still …

The first of the Snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis) are blooming! This is a heartening development, as they are the first flowers of the season in our garden. They mark not so much the beginning of spring as the end of winter.

On a recent Saturday, I spent the morning planting bulbs at Lurie Garden along with other volunteers and staff. This was the beginning of a massive effort to revitalize LG’s spring flower display through planting 61,000 bulbs.

Finally, I’m all done with this year’s bulb planting. The last of them were 100 Glory-of-the-Snow (Chionodoxa forbesii) that I ordered as kind of an afterthought – after I was done with the Tulips, Daffodils, and Alliums.